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KLIC Sessions - INFORMS 2009 PDF Print E-mail
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Thursday, 27 August 2009

Cluster:  Technology Management

 


Session Information: Sunday Oct 11, 08:00 - 09:30


Title:  Knowledge Transfer Across Product, Individual, and Organizational Boundaries Chair: Erica Fuchs,Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Baker Hall 131E, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: Knowledge Transfer Across Individuals and Products in Offshore Manufacturing 

 

Presenting Author: Carolyn Denomme,Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Baker Hall 131E, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Co-Author: Linda Argote,Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Dennis Epple,Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Erica Fuchs,Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Baker Hall 131E, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: This talk provides new insights into the significance of product mix and turnover rates on organizational learning. Analysis draws on three years of detailed production data on one facility’s 1,339 optoelectronic product variations and 7 years of human resource data of the same facility’s 11,742 employees.

 

 

Title: Generative Mechanisms of Inter-Firm Knowledge Access, Mobility, and Organizational Ties 

 

Presenting Author: Rafael Corredoira,Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business, 4557 Van Munching Hall, College Park MD 20742, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: This paper explores whether two generative mechanisms (enduring personal ties and attention-focusing routines) facilitate access to knowledge across firm boundaries that result in a form of innovation: technical solutions granted patents. It departs from extant literature on inter-organizational knowledge transfer by actually testing and providing evidence supporting both generative mechanisms underlying the knowledge access through inventor mobility phenomenon.  

 

 

Title: Intellectual Human Capital and Strategic Alliances: Complements or Substitutes? 

 

Presenting Author: Kwanghui Lim,Assistant Professor, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Co-Author: Pek-hooi Soh,Assistant Professor, Simon Fraser University, Segal Graduate School of Business , 500 Granville Street , Vancouver BC V6C 1W6, Canada, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Annapoornima Subramanian,University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, Berkeley CA, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: We examine how firm and network-level factors shape innovation. At the firm level we categorize human capital into (1) pure scientists (2) bridging scientists and (3) pure inventors. At the network level, university alliances are distinct from inter-firm alliances. Using patent, publication and alliance data on 435 biotechnology firms, we show that pure and bridging scientists substitute university alliances, whereas bridging scientists and pure inventors complement firm alliances.  

 

 

Title: Uncertainty, Learning, and the Termination of Bad Projects Presenting

 

Author: Oliver Baumann,University of Munich,

Co-Author: Dirk Martignoni,University of St. Gallen,

Abstract: Organizations often fail to terminate bad projects. Traditionally, this phenomenon has been framed as a problem of escalation of commitment, suggesting that bad projects should be terminated sooner than later. We use a simulation model of organizational learning to explore the robustness of this argument. We show that under conditions of high uncertainty, it can actually become rational to pursue projects that have a low or even negative estimated value, if an organization does not want to prematurely abandon too many (potentially good) ideas. This result arises as the value of new ideas is often underestimated, and errors of underestimation may be hard to correct in experiential learning processes.

 


Session Information: Sunday Oct 11, 11:00 - 12:30


Title:  Knowledge, Learning, Intellectual Captial (KLIC) - 1: The Dynamics of Learning Chair: Charles Weber,Porland State University, P.O. Box 751 -- ETM, Portland OR 97207, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


 

Title: Status in Open Innovation Contests  

Presenting Author: Cheryl Druehl,Assistant Professor, George Mason University, School of Management, MS 5F4, Fairfax VA 22030, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: Firms such as InnoCentive act as intermediaries between companies with problems to solve (seekers) and individuals offering solutions (solvers). I incorporate status as a motivation into a model of solver participation with the goal of understanding how to design contest environments.  

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Title: How Delays Complicate Organizational Learning 

 

Presenting Author: Hazhir Rahmandad,Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech, 7054 Haycock Road, Room 430, Falls Church VA 22043, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: From investing in product development to burning fossil fuels and spending time on education, delays between taking actions and observing the results are pervasive in individual, organizational, and social settings. In this talk I summarize the major mechanisms through which these delays complicate learning and thus can lead to inefficient allocation of resources and decision-making biases.  

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Title: Knowledge Sharing in Communities: The role of "Community Munificence" 

 

Presenting Author: Zeynep Erden,Doctoral Candidate, ETH Zuerich, KPL G 13, Kreuzplatz 5, Zuerich ZH 8032, Switzerland, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Seonwoo Kim,ETH Zuerich, Kreuzplatz 5, Zuerich, Switzerland, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Georg von Krogh,Professor, ETH Zuerich, Kreuzplatz 5, Zuerich 8032, Switzerland, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: Understanding why people intend to share or avoid sharing knowledge in a community is crucial for the community performance and outcomes. Yet, the role of "community" in explaining why people intend to share knowledge has not been studied in organizational knowledge creation literature. The goal of this paper is to fill the gap in the literature by looking at what community provides to the members that shapes the intentions to share knowledge.  

 

Title: Radical Organizational Learning, Circadian Rhythms and the Broad Structure 

 

Presenting Author: Charles Weber, Associate Professor, Portland State University, Engineering and Technology Mangement, PO Box 751, Portland OR 97201, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: The theory of punctuated equilibrium associates radical change with the disruption of an organization's deep structure. An empirical study of semiconductor photomask manufacturing suggests that radical improvement in organizational performance is contingent upon synchronizing circadian rhythms across a stable broad structure of organizations within and outside the firm.

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Session Information: Sunday Oct 11, 16:30 - 18:00


Title:  NPD and Knowledge Management Chair: Gulru Ozkan,Assistant Professor, Clemson University, Department of Management, 117B Sirrine Hall, Clemson SC 29631, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


 

Title: Product Platform Strategies Implications for Supply Chain Integration 

 

Presenting Author: Juliana Hsuan,Associate Professor, Copenhagen Business School, Dept. of Operations Management, Solbjerg Plads 3, Frederiksberg DK 2000, Denmark, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: A conceptual framework called Platform Product Matrix (PPM) is introduced to assess product platform strategies (i.e. product architecture modularity) with respect to supply chain integration (i.e. the application of inter-organizational systems, supplier involvement, and product customization). PPM provides insights into how product variants would influence supply chain design and resource allocation.  

 

 

Title: Fusion Diffusion Confusion 

 

Presenting Author: Yuwen Chen,Assistant Professor of Supply Chain Management, University of Rhode Island, 7 Lippitt Road, Kingston RI 02881, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Janice Carrillo,Associate Professor, University of Florida, P.O. Box 1171769, Gainesville FL 32611-7169, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: As multifunction products (also referred to as fusion products) gain popularity, we observe that single-function products gradually disappear from the market as they are supplanted by fusion products. This paper presents a product diffusion model that captures the transition from two distinct single-function products into one fusion product. We investigate the optimal launch time of the fusion product and conduct a numerical analysis to demonstrate the dynamics among the three products.  

 

 

Title: Managing New Product Development Knowledge Between Competing Firms 

 

Presenting Author: Gulru Ozkan,Clemson University, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Cheryl Gaimon,Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 W. Peachtree St. NW, Atlanta GA 30308-0520, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: We introduce a two period stochastic game on KM for NPD of two competing firms. First, leader sets price for knowledge transfer (patents); follower decides how much knowledge to acquire. Next, firms pursue knowledge development (problem solving). Finally, both firms release new products. Insights include impact of uncertain market forces.  

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Title: Workforce Knowledge Management and the Implementation of New Technology 

 

Presenting Author: Cheryl Gaimon,Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 W. Peachtree St. NW, Atlanta GA 30308-0520, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Karen Napoleon,University of Georgia, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Gulru Ozkan,Clemson University, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: We consider a firm’s dynamic resource capabilities and demonstrate importance of managing workforce knowledge for a technology upgrade. We examine how workforce knowledge changes over time due to upgrade and independent from it. We capture knowledge depreciation, learning-before-doing, forgetting; showing dramatically different KM strategies are needed before/after an upgrade.

 


Session Information: Tuesday Oct 13, 13:30 - 15:00


Title:  KLIC II Chair: Nile Hatch, Brigham Young University, Marriott School, 690 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


 

Title: The Persistence of Organizational Knowledge across Merger and Acquisition Events 

 

Presenting Author: Peter Madsen, Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University, 585 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: The ability to gain access to new organizational knowledge is a frequently noted justification for corporate mergers and acquisitions. However, there is good reason to expect that much organizational knowledge may be lost during merger and acquisition events. In this paper, I examine the persistence of previously acquired organizational knowledge across mergers and acquisitions in the U.S. airline industry.  

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Title: The Pharma/Biotech Innovation Conundrum: R & D Spending Up, No. of Drugs Down 

Presenting Author: Tom Hill, Principal, The Leverage Innovation Group, 1677 Honfleur Drive, Sunnyvale CA 94087, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: This paper identifies the challenge facing the healthcare industry in terms of research and development productivity. While the industry has doubled spending in R & D in the past 9 years, the number of drugs actually approved has dropped in half. The paper identifies strategic issues that contribute to this lack of productivity, and the role that innovation pathways play toward a solution.  

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Title: Social Network Ties, Transactive Memory, and Performance in Groups 

 

Presenting Author: Kyle Lewis, Associate Professor, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin TX 78712, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Daniel Bachrach, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa AL 35487, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Jeong-Yeon Lee, University of Kansas, Lawrence KS 66045, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: We use transactive memory systems (TMS) theory to explain what drives the effects of certain social network structures in small groups. We examine the combined effects of reciprocity and the number of 'axis' members and TMS on team performance. We find that different network structures differentially affect TMSs and performance. The implications of the results from this experiment for theory, as well as practice are developed.  

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Title: Information Velocity and Competitive Advantage 

Presenting Author: Nile Hatch, Brigham Young University, Marriott School, 690 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Alex Cavallini, Kenco Logistics, Fort Worth TX 76140, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Michael Miles, Brigham Young University, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Ryan Williams, Brigham Young University, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: Information velocity is the ability to respond correctly to uncertain market demand. Manufacturers that transform information into offerings faster than rivals earn competitive advantages through lower costs, growing revenues, and price premia. We find that lean manufacturers have greater information velocity and enjoy 2.5 times greater returns than non-lean firms with lower information velocity. This result is strengthened in markets with high demand volatility.

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Cluster :  Service Operations Management


Session Information  : Tuesday Oct 13, 16:30 - 18:00


Title:  Decision Making and Process Improvement in Complex Service Organizations Chair: Anita Tucker,Assistant Professor, Harvard University, 413 Morgan Hall, Soldiers Field, Boston MA 02478, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


 

Title: Diagnosing in Action: Virtuous and Vicious Cycles 

 

Presenting Author:  Bradley Morrison, Brandeis International Business School, Waltham MA, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author:  John Carroll, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA, United States of America, John Carroll [ This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ]
 

Jenny Rudolph, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge MA, United States of America, Rudolph, Jenny W [ This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ]
 

Abstract: Drawing on observation of doctors handling a medical emergency, we develop a system dynamics model of diagnostic problem solving that links interpretation and choice. Three insights emerge: (1) diagnostic problem solving includes acting, interpreting, and cultivating diagnoses; (2) dynamic interaction among these processes generates adaptive and failed modes problem solving; and (3) reinforcing feedback processes, usually considered dysfunctional, are essential for adaptive problem solving.   

 

 

 

Title: Diversity in Experience and Team Familiarity: Evidence from Software Development 

 

Presenting Author: Bradley Staats, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina, Kenan Flagler Business School, McColl Building, Chapel Hill NC, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Co-Author: Robert Huckman, Associate Professor, Harvard Business School, Morris Hall, Boston MA 02163, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: Fluid teams with different sets of prior experience execute critical projects in organizations. Though building teams with diverse experience is needed, work on diversity in experience and performance fails to find a consistent effect. The issue is that diversity improves a team's functioning, but creates coordination challenges. We hypothesize that team familiarity helps teams leverage the benefits of diversity by alleviating coordination problems. We test this with software project data. 

 

 

 

Title: Resource Allocation in Software Maintenance 

 

Presenting Author: Sriram Narayanan, Assistant Professor, Michigan State University, N357 Business College Complex, East Lansing MI 48824, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Sridhar Balasubramanian, Roy & Alice H. Richards Bicentennial Scholar and Associate Professor, Kenan-Flagler Business School, Campus Box 3490, McColl Building, Chapel Hill NC 27599, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Jay Swaminathan, Kay and Van Weatherspoon Distinguished Professor of Operations, Technology and Innovation Management, Kenan-Flagler Business School, Campus Box 3490, McColl Building, Chapel Hill NC 27599, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: We study allocation of engineering resources in software maintenance. We show that as software bugs stay in the system longer, the probability of successfully resolving them reduces. We use this insight to estimate engineering resources required to manage debugging effort. We explore cut off policy based on threshold time without finding a successful resolution. Our analysis shows that such policies minimally impact rate of successful resolution and reduce waiting times for incoming bugs.  

 

 

 

Title: Do Professional Service Firms Learn from Outsourced Pojects

 

Presenting Author: Ram Ganeshan, Professor, College of William and Mary, Mason School of Business, Williamsburg va 23185, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Co-Author: Tonya Boone, Associate Professor, College of William & Mary, Operations & Information Technology, Mason School of Business, Williamsburg VA, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Robert L. Hicks, Associate Professor, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg  VA 23185, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract: Using data from a professional service firm, our research investigates if and how much, and why service firms learn from projects that are outsourced. We use learning-curve models to determine learning and forgetting rates; and provide insights into the enablers and barriers to learning with experience.

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