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KLIC Sessions - INFORMS 2008 PDF Print E-mail
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Saturday, 03 January 2009

Joint Clusters:  Technology Management; Organization Science


Session Information: Sunday Oct 12, 08:00 - 09:30


Title:  Joint Session TMS/OS: KLIC: Team and Organizational Learning and Knowledge Management

Chair: Gulru Ozkan, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 West Peachtree St NW, Atlanta GA 30308, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: Knowledge Management for New Product Development in a Competitive Environment

Presenting Author: Gulru Ozkan, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 West Peachtree St NW, Atlanta GA 30308, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Cheryl Gaimon, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 West Peachtree St NW, Atlanta GA 30308, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: We introduce a game theoretic model that explores knowledge management strategies in an NPD domain for two competing firms. Firms’ knowledge levels increase via problem solving (PS) and knowledge transfer/sharing (KT). KT mechanisms considered are general licensing, cross licensing, and joint venture. Firms’ maximize profit (consists of revenue/cost of KT, cost of PS and revenue earned from new products). Optimal solutions characterize the extent and the mechanism that firms pursue PS and KT.

 

Title:  Learning by Doing or Learning by Don’ting: Organizational Learning from Prior Success and Failure (***NO SHOW***)

Presenting Author: Peter Madsen, Marrriott School - BYU, 585 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Vinit Desai, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Campus Box A005/165, CU Denver, Denver CO, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Using data from the global orbital launch vehicle industry, we examine the relative effects of prior success and prior failure experiences on organizational learning. The results indicate that orbital launch vehicle organizations learn from both prior successes and prior failures, but that they learn much more effectively from prior failures. Furthermore, the knowledge gained from prior failures appears to depreciate at a much slower rate than that learned from prior successes.

 

Title: Learn-how to Overcome the Challenges to Organizational Learning

Presenting Author: Anita Tucker,Assistant Professor, Harvard Business School, Soldiers Field, Morgan Hall 431, Boston MA 02163, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Richard Bohmer,Harvard Business School, Soldiers Field Road, Boston MA, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Joseph Carpenter, Vermont Oxford Network, 33 Kilburn Street, Burlington VT, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Jeffrey Horbar, Vermont Oxford Network, 33 Kilburn Street, Burlington VT, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Ingrid Nembhard, Assistant Professor, Yale University, 60 College Street, PO Box 208034, New Haven CT 06520, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: This paper proposes that learn-how - activities that operationalize new practices in a given setting - helps organizations improve their performance because it is associated with three enablers of organizational learning for new practice implementation: staff buy-in, practice adaptation and interdisciplinary collaboration. We test whether these enablers mediate the relationship between learn-how and performance in a sample of hospital units.

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Title: Transactive Memory and Team Performance

Presenting Author: Linda Argote, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: The presentation will apply the concept of transactive memory to work teams. Predictors of transactive memory will be developed. Consequences of transactive memory for team performance will be described. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future research on transactive memory that is likely to be fruitful.

 


Joint Clusters:  Technology Management; Organization Science


Session Information: Sunday Oct 12, 16:30 - 18:00


Title:  Joint Session TMS/OS: KLIC: Influence of Structure (Team, Goals, and Technology) on Learning

Chair: Charles Weber, Assistant Professor of Eng. & Tech. Mgmnt., Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland OR 97207, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: Offshoring and the Geography of Innovation

Presenting Author: Francisco Veloso, Associate Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Baker Hall 131D, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Brian Fifarek, Carnegie Mellon University, Engineering & Public Policy, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Abstract: This paper investigates the long term impact of the globalization of knowledge and value chain offshoring on the spatial distribution of innovation activities. It examines the spatial pattern of innovation in rare earth applications from 1976 to 2002. It finds that rare earth catalyst innovation activities expand globally, while rare earth magnet innovation activities become more clustered and that these responses are conditioned by the role of geographic within value chain knowledge

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Title: The Effects of Problem Structure and Team Diversity on Brainstorming Effectiveness

Presenting Author: Svenja Sommer, Assistant Professor of Management, HEC School of Management, Jouy-en-Josas, France, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Stylianos Kavadias, Associate Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 W. Peachtree St., NW, Atlanta GA, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Since Osborne 1957 brainstorming has acquired a central role during the ideation stage of many product development projects. Yet, experiments reported in the social psychology literature suggest that group brainstorming is an ineffective way to generate ideas. We revisit the two different arguments and develop a formal model of idea generation in product development. We show that the answer is not unidirectional but contingent on the problem structure and team diversity.

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Title: Diminishing Returns on Knowledge in Operations Management

Presenting Author: Charles Weber, Assistant Professor of Eng. & Tech. Mgmnt., Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland OR 97207, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Asser Fayed, Cypress Semiconductors, Cypress Park, Bloomington MN, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: An empirically grounded model of the operating curve a high tech manufacturing facility, which is sufficiently accurate to make capitalization decisions, has been developed. The model is used to simulate the performance of a hypothetical facility that operates under very realistic conditions. Results of the simulation show that the value of additional technological knowledge can be negative. Learning more of a good thing is not always a good idea!

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Title: Brooks’ Law Revisited: Improving Software Productivity by Managing Complexity

Presenting Author: Michael Lapre, Associate Professor of Management, Vanderbilt University, Owen Graduate School of Management, 401 21st Avenue South, Nashville TN 37203, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Joe Blackburn, Vanderbilt University, 401 21st Avenue South, Nashville TN, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Luk Van Wassenhove, INSEAD, Boulevard de Constance, Fontainebleau, France, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: According to Brooks’ law for software development projects “adding manpower to a late software project makes it later.” Building on Brooks’ law, we argue that complexity increases the maximum team size in software development projects and that maximum team size decreases software development productivity. Using a dataset of 117 software development projects conducted in Finland, we find strong support for our hypotheses.

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Cluster:  Technology Management


Session Information: Monday Oct 13, 08:00 - 09:30


Title:  KLIC: Origin, Diffusion and Management of Knowledge for Competitive Advantage

Chair: David Moore, KLICNET.ORG, 3788 Davidson Place, Boulder CO, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: The Hidden Structure of Mental Maps

Presenting Author: Charles Weber, Assistant Professor of Eng. & Tech. Mgmnt., Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland OR 97207, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Brent Zenobia, Instructor, Portland State University, 2214 NE 40th Avenue, Portland OR 97212, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Most prior work on mental maps has focused on techniques for their elicitation and representation; what can be gleaned from investigating their structure? This study applies the Motive-Technology-Belief (MTB) framework to analyze structural relationships in mental maps to gain insight into the underlying processes of learning and technology adoption. A previously unsuspected feedback loop operates between bounded rationality and intuition; implications for technology management are discussed.

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Title: The Evolution of Technological Paths and Market Value

Presenting Author: Kun Liu, Assistant Professor, Washington State University, Pullman WA, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: We investigate how the evolution of technological path affects the firm's market value. We suggest that innovations of the same technological paths are genealogically related, which allows the firm to better protect and appropriate value from its intellectual property rights. Our results show that such superior position of appropriating value from intellectual property rights increases the firm's market value.

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Title: Institutional Convergence and the Diffusion of University- Versus Firm-origin Technologies

Presenting Author: Andrew Nelson, Assistant Professor of Strategy, University of Oregon, Lundquist College of Business, Eugene OR 97403, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: While knowledge flows are a major theme in the strategy literature, our understanding of the processes by which knowledge moves between different organizations remains thin. By mixing longitudinal network analyses with rich archival data for specific inventions, I outline various channels through which knowledge spreads over time, the reliance of these channels on personal networks, and the role of personal connections in shaping the struggle between community and competitive orientations.

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Title: Not Invented Here: Managing Corporate Innovation in a New Era

Presenting Author: Vareska van de Vrande, Assistant Professor, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, Burgemeester Oudlaan 50, Room T7-33, Rotterdam 3062 PA, Netherlands, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 Abstract: Nowadays, the behavior of innovating firms has changed considerably. Instead of performing all their R&D activities in-house, companies are now increasingly looking for new ideas outside the boundaries of their own organization. As a result, the portfolio of external sourcing modes firms engage in has expanded. This thesis focuses on the use of different modes for external technology sourcing, including strategic alliances, corporate venture capital investments, and mergers and acquisitions.

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Cluster:  Technology Management


Session Information: Monday Oct 13, 13:30 - 15:00


Title:  KLIC: Knowledge Networks and the Emergence of New Technologies (Sloan Session)

Chair: Erica Fuchs, Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Baker Hall 131E, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: The Evolution and Performance of Research Groups

Presenting Author: Francisco Veloso, Associate Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Baker Hall 131D, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Leonardo Reyes-Gonzalez, Carnegie Mellon University, Engineering & Public Policy, 5000 Forbes Av, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: This work analyzes how research groups (RGs) in institutions are formed and evolve. We characterize RGs by looking at co-authorship and assessing the strength and cohesiveness of ties among authors over time, both within and across institutions. With this technique, we track the movement of researchers across co-authorship groups and assess how science self-organizes over several decades and across entire scientific fields. We then explore how the nature of RG relates to performance and impact.

 

Title: Institutional Environments & Network Emergence: The Case of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Presenting Author: Jeff Furman, Assistant Professor, Boston University, 595 Commonwealth Ave - 653a, Boston MA 02215, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Fiona Murray, MIT-Sloan, 50 Memorial Drive, E52-568, Cambridge MA 02142, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: This paper examines the role of institutional environments on the emergence of scientific networks. Specifically, we consider the case of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. We exploit the fact that key research materials are subject to different IP restrictions in the US and Europe to examine the relationship between institutional environments and the growth and structure of the hESC research communities.

 

Title: The Role of DARPA in Seeding and Encouraging New Technology Trajectories

Presenting Author: Erica Fuchs, Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Baker Hall 131E, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: This study unpacks how DARPA leverages social networks among technologists to seed and encourage new technology trajectories in the computing industry. The results show how DARPA (1) facilitates brainstorming sessions among thought leaders, (2) provides seed funding to unconnected researchers working on related projects, (3) brings funded researchers together to discuss their results, and (4) acting as third party validation of new technologies to latter-stage funding agencies and industry.

 

Title: Collaboration Matters: Evidence from the US-Japan Inventor Survey

Presenting Author: John Walsh, Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, Public Policy, 685 Cherry St, Atlanta GA 30332, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Sadao Nagaoka, Professor, Hitotsubashi University, Institute of Innovation Research, 2-1 Naka, Kunitachi TO 186-8603, Japan, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Using the US-Japan inventor surveys, we examine collaboration patterns across the two countries, and how the innovation process varies by industry and organization. We find invention draws heavily on outside sources and is often a cooperative activity, much more than bibliometric data suggests. Furthermore, the degree of cooperation is broadly similar across the two countries. We also find, using the US data, that collaboration is associated with patent value and commercialization.

 


Cluster:  Technology Management


Session Information: Tuesday Oct 14, 11:00 - 12:30


Title:  KLIC: Team and Organizational Learning and Knowledge Management Chair: Nile Hatch, Marriott School - BYU, 619 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: Learning to Operate: Management of Knowledge Creation and Transfer in Orthopedic Surgeries

Presenting Author: Nile Hatch, Marriott School - BYU, 619 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: David Moore, KLICNET.ORG, 3788 Davidson Place, Boulder CO, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: The economics of hospital health care reward efficiency and quality. Using a sample of almost 15,000 orthopedic surgeries, we study the learning processes of surgeons, surgical teams, and hospitals. While experience matters, so does management of learning. We find that some hospital management practices promote learning and efficiency while others impede learning.

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Title: Learning in Professional Services

Presenting Author: Ram Ganeshan, Associate Professor, College of William and Mary, Mason School of Business, Williamsburg, VA  23185, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Tonya Boone, Associate Professor, College of William and Mary, Mason School of Business, Williamsburg, VA  23185, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Robert L. Hicks, Associate Professor, College of William and Mary, Department of Economics, Williamsburg, VA  23185, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: This talk focuses on the dynamics of learning in professional services. Using learning curve theory, and supported by project-level data from an architecture-engineering firm, we report on how professional firms learn; how different units within the firm transfer and leverage knowledge for project effectiveness; and if and how it leverages knowledge from sub-contracted projects.

 

Title: How do Organizations Really Learn from Their Experience? A Construal Based View

Presenting Author: Chris Bingham, University of Maryland, 4519 Van Munching Hall, College Park MD 20742, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: While research suggests that firms learn from their experience, little is known about how such learning occurs. Using data on the country entries of new venture firms we explore this gap. Specifically, we bring to light the importance of two forms of cognitive construal, both of which influence whether and how learning takes place over time. Overall, our findings have implications for the underexplored interplay between cognition and behavior that lies at the heart of experiential learning.

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Title: Novelty and Appropriability: The Role of Entrepreneurial Knowledge

Presenting Author: Tony Briggs, Doctoral Candidate, Boston University, 595 Commonwealth Ave., Boston MA, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Why do entrepreneurs share information when others can steal their ideas? I present an ex ante information sharing framework in which novel information is abundant but of predominantly poor quality. Evidence of "entrepreneurial knowledge" about novel complementary asset combinations is illustrated by a historical example and by primary data from repeat entrepreneurs. Implications for strategy, knowledge management, and entrepreneurship are discussed.

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Cluster:  Technology Management


Session Information: Tuesday Oct 14, 13:30 - 15:00


Title:  Evaluation and Metrics of Knowledge Systems and Knowledge Management Chair: Elie Geisler, Distinguished Professor, Stuart School of Business--Illinois Institute of Technology, 565 W. Adams Street, Chicago IL 60661, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: Metrics for Relating the Outputs of a Knowledge Management System to the Host Organization’s Critical Success Factors

Presenting Author: Albert Rubenstein, President, IASTA Inc., This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Herbert Schlikenmaier, NASA, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: The authors and their colleagues performed a Knowledge Capture study for the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate in NASA. The study yielded over 300 “knowledge nuggets” in the form of “IF x..THEN y” statements about project management and related matters in ongoing and completed projects. The next steps involve constructing “criteria trees”, relating the content of such nuggets to several levels of “critical success factors (CSFs) for various functional units and the organization as a whole, in terms of outputs and impacts.

 

Title: Metrics: Why Then What or What Then Why

Presenting Author: Charles Thompson, Professor, IE/MS Department, Northwestern University, Evanston,  IL 60208, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 Abstract: Metrics can be simple or complex, or something in between. It may be useful to distinguish the processes appropriate for the degree to which the problem is unstructured and/or multidisciplinary (what/how hard is it). And it may be useful to distinguish the processes appropriate for the degree to which the solution must increase our/someone's confidence and/or utility (why do we want to know). Matching the degree of uncertainty of the problem and/or of the solution with the variety of available processes might provide a useful checklist (or path through the problem solving maze)

 

Title: Measuring Firm Innovativeness: Towards a Composite Innovation Index Built on Firm Innovative Posture, Propensity and Performance Attributes (***NO SHOW***)

Presenting Author: Elias Carayannis, Professor, Department of Information Systems and Technology Management, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: The ability to innovate is generally accepted as a critical success factor to growth and future performance of firms. Yet, this acceptance obscures a comprehensive perspective on how firms can influence their innovation capacity and resulting performance. This paper proposes a “3P” construct of innovation measurement that simultaneously considers the posture, propensity and performance related to a firm’s innovative capabilities. We propose and provide empirical support showing that robust measurement of the performance implications of innovation requires simultaneous consideration of input, throughput and output factors. Single or more limited indicators do not offer the degree of fine-tuning to a firm’s innovation system that managers require. Thus, we propose the development, and future research into contingent variations of a Composite Innovation Index. We further demonstrate its use in comparing innovators and allowing managers to design a firm’s innovation system.

 

Title: The Evolution of Knowledge Management from Concepts to Metrics

Presenting Author: Elie Geisler, Distinguished Professor, Stuart School of Business--Illinois Institute of Technology, 565 W. Adams Street, Chicago IL 60661, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:  The rapidly growing field of knowledge management has many challenges. Researchers are confronted with the need to define the concept of knowledge, and to offer metrics of its outputs, benefits and value to organizations. This paper traces the evolution of knowledge management through the mapping of its key concepts and its main problems. Knowledge management has developed as a field of study independent of information systems, but it is still facing fundamental challenges such as the definition of its unit of analysis. This paper offers a coherent model of evolution of knowledge management which delineates its stages of development, the problems it faces, and some solutions offered by its researchers.

 


Cluster:  Technology Management


Session Information: Tuesday Oct 14, 16:30 - 18:00


Title:  Managing Knowledge-intensive Processes

Chair: Enno Siemsen, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois, 350 Wohler Hall, 1206 S. Sixth Street, Champaign IL 61820, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: The Role of Informational Spillovers on Competitive R&D Search

Presenting Author: Nektarios Oraiopoulos,Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 West Peachtree St., NW, Atlanta GA 30308, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Stylianos Kavadias, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 West Peachtree St., NW, Atlanta GA 30308, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: A long tradition in the economics literature has argued that knowledge cannot be fully contractible but it gets disseminated through noisy channels. While prior research has studied the impact of those informational spillovers on the R&D intensity, we focus on the direction of the R&D search path. Our analysis reveals strong path dependencies and characterizes the conditions under which a firm benefits from exploiting past research efforts (generated by rivals) versus exploring a new domain.

 

Title: Why Do We Rework? The Role of Some Dyadic Interactions at Work

Presenting Author: Manuel Sosa, Associate Professor of Technology and Operations Management, INSEAD, Boulevard de Constance, Fontainebleau 77305, France, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Rework is the (full or partial) repetition of tasks due to arrival of new or updated information. I study the rework phenomenon at the dyadic level. What characterizes dyadic interactions that lead to rework? I examine knowledge-based and social networks determinants of rework in a software development organization.

 

Title: Decentralized Balancing of Complementary Tasks

Presenting Author: Enno Siemsen, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois, 350 Wohler Hall, 1206 S. Sixth Street, Champaign IL 61820, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Sridhar Balasubramanian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler Business School, Chapel Hill NC 27599, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Pradeep Bhardwaj, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler Business School, Chapel Hill NC, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Much is known about resource balancing in a centralized context. If decision making is decentralized, such as in white collar teams working on knowledge intensive projects, much less is known about how team members allocate resources and respond to their mutual interdependence. Two means of balancing are possible: either team members help out at the bottleneck, or they adjust their efforts to the bottleneck. We compare these two ways of balancing in a game theoretic framework.

 


Cluster:  Technology Management


Session Information: Wednesday Oct 15, 11:00 - 12:30


Title:  Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Managing Knowledge and IT Chair: Dr. Pratim Datta, Kent State University, A408 M&IS, Kent OH 44236, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it


Abstract Details


Title: Intra-firm Markets for Information

Presenting Author: John Popham, Information Architect, IBM, 4341 Chesapeake Street NW, Washington DC 20016, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Entrepreneurial organizations within firms often hide information and knowledge assets in order to maintain a competitive advantage and/or avoid perceived costs associated with enterprise-level IT regulation. Intra-firm markets for information can support mechanisms that promote knowledge sharing among firm organizations, provide meaningful measurements of firm information asset value, and identify firm organizations that act as centers of competency in high-value knowledge generation.

 

Title: Strategic Pacing and the Progress Trap of IT Innovations

 

Presenting Author: Dr. Pratim Datta, Kent State University, A408 M&IS, Kent OH 44236, United States of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Sergei Anokhin, Department of M&IS, Kent State University, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract: Is the current pace of IT innovations "too much of a good thing"? The paper argues that there is a progress trap of IT innovations where too many innovations too fast may lead to diminishing returns on R&D efforts. Unless firms strategically “pace" their IT innovations (both incremental & radical) by controlling timeliness & diversity of IT innovations, firms will fall prey to a progress trap through execution shortfalls, cannibalization, low shelf life, & competence rigidity.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 04 January 2009 )
 
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