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KLIC Sessions - INFORMS 2006 PDF Print E-mail

Cluster: Technology Management 

Program Summary and Meeting Agenda

Session Information: Sunday Nov 05, 2006, 13:30 - 15:00

Session Details
Title:KLIC I
Chair:   Nile Hatch, Assistant Professor, Marriott School, Brigham Young University, 790 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
Abstract Details
Title:Exploration and Exploitation in Complex Networks: Learning Rates and Interpersonal Networks
Presenting Author: Melissa Schilling, Associate Professor of Management, Stern School of Business, New York University, 40 West Fourth Street, New York NY 10012, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:The rate at which superior solutions spread through an interpersonal network is strongly influenced by the learning rate utilized by individuals and the underlying network structure. We find that very low levels of random linking increase performance, but higher levels of random linking lower performance. Small-world network properties can enhance organizational learning by enabling short path lengths and semi-isolated pockets of heterogeneous knowledge to exist simultaneously in a network.
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Title:Cross-Training, Social Identity and Knowledge Sharing
Presenting Author: Enno Siemsen, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Business Administration, 350 Wohlers Hall, 1206 S. Sixth Street, Champaign IL 61820, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Sridhar Balasubramanian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler Business School, Campus Box 3490, McColl Building, Chapel Hill NC 27599, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Aleda Roth, Arizona State University, W.P. Carey School of Business, Main Campus, PO Box 874706, Tempe AZ 85287, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:This research explores the relationship between cross-training and inter-employee knowledge sharing. Cross-training can increase knowledge sharing, for example by enabling better communication between employees. On the other hand, cross-training increases the functional similarity between employees, which in turn can increase the competition between them, thereby reducing knowledge sharing behavior. We explore these relationships empirically using survey data from three different companies.
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Title:Dissecting Organizational Knowledge: Multimodal Apprenticeship in Vascular Surgery
Presenting Author: Curtis LeBaron, Associate Professor, Brigham Young University, 790 Tanner Building, Marriott School, Provo UT 84602, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:This is a video-based study of instruction within a surgical team. The attending surgeon, who is most expert, provides subtle visible and vocal prompts for the work of the resident, who is a novice. Such “scaffolding” behaviors are a form of practice that emerge organically within surgical activity, supporting the novice’s performance as needed and to the extent needed, disappearing into the folds of interaction as the resident develops expertise.
Title:Fractal Knowledge and Technological Change in Semiconductors and Disk Drives
Presenting Author: Roger Bohn, Professor, University of California - San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0519, IR/PS, La Jolla CA 92093-0519, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Knowledge can be modeled as a causal graph which grows as more is learned. Such graphs are fractal: parent-child relationships become complex subgraphs as more is learned. These patterns are illustrated by semiconductor lithography and hard disk drive head design. As product generations get smaller (Moore's Law), new physical relationships become large enough to be important. Also, incremental and radical technical change can be measured by how the graph changes.
 

Session Information: Sunday Nov 05, 2006, 16:30 - 18:00

Session Details
Title:KLIC II
Chair:   David Moore, Klicnet.org, 3788 Davidson Place, Boulder CO 80305, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
Abstract Details
Title:Pharmaceutical-Biotechnology R&D: Implications for Alliance Performance
Presenting Author: Jongwook Kim, Assistant Professor, Western Washington University, 351 Parks Hall MS9075, 516 High Street, Bellingham WA 98225, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Alliance opportunities are often characterized by information asymmetry, particularly where key resources are intellectual property. In the context of biotechnology-pharmaceutical alliances, I test how alliance characteristics impact performance. The data support the claim that utilization of network ties may be informational in nature where the role of reputation and network ties in latter stages diminish as the odds of success are higher, and more emphasis is placed on firm competence.
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Title:Patents in Practice: Systemic Failures of Knowledge Representation in the US Patent System
Presenting Author: Tony Briggs, Doctoral Candidate, Boston University Graduate School of Management, Information Systems Department, 595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston MA 02215, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Paul Carlile, Associate Professor, Boston University, 595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston MA 02215, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:The US patent system is charged to promote the progress of science and useful arts. While patents are managed as economic devices across firms, they are seldom used as knowledge repositories to shape innovation within firms. We use a knowledge management framework to examine 3 generic patenting practices: development, examination, and enforcement. We find that different practices lead to either knowledge obfuscation or obsolescence, resulting in the systemic failure to inform future innovation.
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Title:Social Capital and the Creation of Knowledge
Presenting Author: Claudia Gonzalez-Brambila, Business School, Instituto Technologico Autonomo, Rio Hondo 1, Mexico, D.F. 01000, Mexico, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: David Krackhardt, Heinz School, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Francisco Veloso, Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, Engineering & Public Policy, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:We examine the relation between knowledge creation, measured through published papers, and social capital, characterized through co-authorship. Using an extensive panel, analysis suggests that, contrary to previous results, structural holes are not significant; what matters are direct ties, being central, working across areas of knowledge, and being in non dense networks.
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Title:Organizational Learning in Distributed Innovation Planning
Presenting Author: Edward Anderson, Professor, University of Texas, McCombs Business School, 1 University Station B6500, Austin TX 78733, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Nitin Joglekar, Associate Professor, Boston University, 525 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston MA 02215, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Using a complex systems/system dynamics perspective, we examine the co-evolutionary relationship between the market, innovation, products and capabilities in distributed environments. In particular, we argue that the role of capability planning is of the highest leverage in guiding innovation. We also argue that this planning must incorporate extensive levels of risk management and flexibility because of the inherent path dependence in such complex systems.
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Session Information: Monday Nov 06, 2006, 10:00 - 11:30

Session Details
Title:KLIC III
Chair:   Anita Tucker, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania, 551 Huntsman Hall, 3730 Walnut Street, Philadelphia PA 19066, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
Abstract Details
Title:Knowledge Management for Product and Process Design Teams
Presenting Author: Cheryl Gaimon, Regents' Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, College of Management, 800 West Peachtree Street, Atlanta GA 30308-0520, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Gulru Ozkan, PhD Student, Georgia Institute of Technology, College of Management, 800 West Peachtree St., NW, Atlanta GA 30308-0520, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:We consider strategies for managing product and process design team knowledge. Net revenue is a function of knowledge. Each team's knowledge increases from learning-by-doing, knowledge transfer, and induced learning. We determine the optimal rate and direction for knowledge transfer and the optimal rate that induced learning should be pursued over time. Key results include conditions that drive different managerial strategies including the delay in knowledge creation.
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Title:Myopia of Selection: Does Organizational Adaptation Limit the Efficacy of Population Selection?
Presenting Author: Hart Posen, Assistant Professor of Strategy, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, 701 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Daniel Levinthal, Professor of Management, Wharton School - University of Pennsylvania, Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia PA 19104, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it  
Abstract:A central tenet of the evolutionary analogue in organization theory is that selection disproportionately removes less fit firms. However, the analogue is imperfect because variation is not blind - firms engage in adaptive learning. Is the efficacy of selection invariant to the nature of the adaptation process? We find that learning intended to enhance the performance of individual firms may have the unintended consequence of reducing the efficacy of selection in identifying superior firms.
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Title:Knowledge and Learning in Complex Business Systems
Presenting Author: Ram Akella, University of California at Santa Cruz and Silicon Valley Center, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Kristin Fridgeirsdottir, London Business School, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ;
Arvind Vidyarthi, Altera;
Eric Wang,
Zuobing Xu, UC Santa Cruz, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it , WKT
Abstract:We will describe a unifying approach we have been developing over several years for speeding up knowledge capture, learning, and associated business decision making across several industries. These include semiconductor, automotive, airline, IT, call/service centers and health. Our approach fuses resource management, financial and risk management, and knowledge management and has impacted worldwide industry. We summarize the integration of techniques ranging from statistics, queuing, and finance, to text/data mining, which enable optimized learning.
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Title:Learning While Sourcing: Productivity Gains While Coordinating Software Development
Presenting Author: Paulo Gomes, Assistant Professor, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Campolide, Lisbon 1099-032, Portugal, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Nitin Joglekar, Associate Professor, Boston University, 525 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston MA 02215, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Steve Rosenthal, Professor, Boston University School of Management, 525 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston MA 02215, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Organization theory makes a distinction between work conducted within an organization’s technical core and coordination processes that buffer this core from the environment. We build on this distinction to look for evidence of learning while sourcing. Learning is not observed in terms of total effort. Segregation yields significant effects: learning associated with the management of distributed software development is significant for coordination tasks and less pronounced for technical tasks.
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Session Information: Monday Nov 06, 13:30 - 15:00

Session Details
Title:KLIC IV
Chair:   Charles Weber, Assistant Professor of Engineering and Technology Management, Portland State University, ETM, PO Box 751, Portland OR 97207, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract Details
Title:Exploring Unique Learning in Bio-Pharmaceutical Innovation
Presenting Author: Deborah Dougherty, Professor, Rutgers University, 1169 Lincoln Ct, Long Branch NJ 07740, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Danielle Dunne, PhD Student, Rutgers University, 111 Washington St, Newark NJ 07102, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Discovering and developing a new medicine requires ongoing alignment of disparate systems of knowing and doing – sciences, technologies, strategy, and operations – over 16 years and across multiple firm boundaries. This process cannot be simplified in the usual way (no paths, feedback, or modularity). We tease out unique learning for compounds and pipeline management, and suggest ways to enhance learning in this science-based industry that can also inform innovation management in general.
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Title:Managing Pre-Technological Knowledge: A Multi-Dimensional Approach
Presenting Author: Charles Weber, Assistant Professor of Engineering and Technology Management, Portland State University, ETM, PO Box 751, Portland OR 97207, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Bohn (1994) states that many high technology industrial processes are based on pre-technological knowledge -- knowledge that is incompletely characterized or cannot be measured. An empirical study suggests that high tech industrial processes are based on subsystem knowledge and prior, architectural knowledge that has been completely characterized. However, integration knowledge is pre-technological, and may be inherently so.
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Title:The Effect of Information Technology on Knowledge Retention in Organizations
Presenting Author: Linda Argote, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Michael Ashworth, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Tridas Mukhopadhyay, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh pa 15213, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Our research examines whether new information technology (IT) contributes to an organization’s ability to retain knowledge. We conducted a cross-sectional time series analysis monthly data spanning five years at six financial institution payment processing facilities. Results indicate that the IT enhances the retention of knowledge about productivity.
 
Title:Choices and Outcomes: The Effects of Improvement Project Portfolio Choices
Presenting Author: Anita Tucker, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania, 551 Huntsman Hall, 3730 Walnut Street, Philadelphia PA 19066, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Richard Bohmer, Associate Professor, Harvard University, Morgan Hall, Soldiers Field Road, Boston MA 02163, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Ingrid Nembhard, Doctoral Candidate, Harvard University, Morgan Hall 480B, Soldiers Field Road, Boston MA 02163, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Healthcare organizations strive to improve the quality of care they deliver. For many, the first step is to develop a portfolio of improvement projects. We present data from 44 intensive care units that created such portfolios by selecting among 93 practices they had collaboratively developed. We examine the effects of three portfolio choices - number of practices, type of practices and project team - and interactions among choices, on patient length of stay, infection rates and mortality.
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