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KLIC Sessions - INFORMS 2005 PDF Print E-mail

Cluster: Technology Management


Session Information: Sunday Nov 13, 2005, 08:00 - 09:30

Session Details
Title:KLIC I -- Individual-Organizational Linkages
Chair:  

Charles Weber, Assistant Professor, Portland State University, Post Office Box 751, Department of Engineering and Technology, Portland OR 97207-0751, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Abstract Details
Title:Characterizing the Value-Driven Learning Curve
Lead: Charles Weber, Assistant Professor, Portland State University, Post Office Box 751, Department of Engineering and Technology, Portland OR 97207-0751, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:The traditional cost-driven learning curve does not satisfactorily explain many high tech organizational learning phenomena such as learning high-velocity environments (Eisenhart & Bourgeois) learning before doing (Pisano), yield-driven learning, (Bohn & Terwiesch) learning while ramping (Terwiesch & Bohn), designing for learning, platform leadership (Gawer & Cusumano) and increasing returns (Arthur). A promising value-based alternative is presented.
 
Title:Agent-based Social Simulation in Organizational Learning: A Micro Perspective
Lead: Brent Capps-Zenobia, Ph.D. Student, Portland State University - ETM, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Charles Weber, Assistant Professor, Portland State University, Post Office Box 751, Department of Engineering and Technology, Portland OR 97207-0751, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Historically, organizational learning has focused on the macro-perspective (learning curve, Lotka-Volterra equations). The point of view of the individual has not been discussed exhaustively. Agent-based social simulation, an approach in which human behavior is simulated by automata, presents itself as an alternative. A case from innovation adoption is presented.
 
Title:A Dynamic Model of Transactive Memory Systems
Lead: Edward Anderson, University of Texas at Austin Business School, McCombs School of Business, 1 University Station B6500, Austin TX 78733, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Kyle Lewis, Asst. Professor, University of Texas, McCombs School of Business, 1 University Station B6300, Austin TX 78712, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:A key determinant of any product development group’s performance is its transactive memory system (TMS): its shared, tacit memory system for managing and communicating information relevant to the group. We build a system dynamics model relating TMS to productivity by leveraging the theory of learning-by-doing at both the group and individual levels. We also include the effects of “group forgetting,” specialization, and knowledge obsolescence.
 
Title:Individual-Organization Link and Knowledge
Lead: Teppo Felin, Visiting Assistant Professor, Emory, 1300 Clifton Road, Atlanta GA 30322, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: William Hesterly, Professor, University of Utah, David Eccles School of Business, Salt Lake City UT 84112, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:In this paper we address the individual-organization link as it relates to knowledge, and we explicate the problem of transformation between levels. Specifically - how, when, and why can we meaningfully talk about organizational knowledge? We also address some of the fallacies associated with specifying the organization as the repository knowledge and move toward explicating the underlying theoretical mechanisms and micro-foundations. Finally we outline critical future directions related to the micro-macro link for knowledge-based work in organization science.
 

Session Information: Sunday Nov 13, 10:00 - 11:30

Session Details
Title:KLIC II -- Fundamental Models and Processes
Chair:   David Moore, Assistant Professor, Colorado School of Mines, Economics and Business Division, 814 15th Street, Golden CO 80401, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract Details
Title:Linking Learning Services with Business Processes: The Strategic Value of Learning
Lead: Thomas Hill, Director, Learning and Knowledge Management, Genetech, 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco CA 94080-4990, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:This work analyzes the programs of companies like Shell, Reuters, HP and Genentech in moving learning from an event orientation to a process one, showing the linkages of learning services to business processes, alignment with corporate business processes and finally positioning and evaluating learning based on strategic business impact.
 
Title:Production Functional Structures of Additive Production Performance Metrics
Lead: David Moore, Assistant Professor, Colorado School of Mines, Economics and Business Division, 814 15th Street, Golden CO 80401, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Existence of additive decompositions of performance metrics such as cycle time, throughput, cost and yield as posited by (Zhangwill and Kantor) will be demonstrated in a production economic framework. We characterize all functional representations of production technologies having performance metrics with additive decompositons, and present empirical tests verifying, and apriori technological conditions implying existence of additive decompositions.
 
Title:Prior Knowledge in the Learning Curve: An Exploration of Form and Function
Lead: Nile Hatch, Marriott School - BYU, 790 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Stefan Reichelstein, Stanford University, Stanford CA, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:It is common to assume that the cost of the first unit is a control for the level knowledge at the beginning of a learning curve. We show that the shape and rate of learning depends on the level of prior knowledge and that the cost of the first unit does not control for this knowledge. We propose a functional form that controls for prior learning and test its performance in estimating learning curves in semiconductor manufacturing.
 
Title:Evolving Backwards: Technological Knowledge as a Causal Graph
Lead: Roger Bohn, Professor, UC San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0519, La Jolla CA 92093, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Technological knowledge can be modeled as a causal knowledge graph (CKG). In this model, knowledge tends to evolve backwards over time, from effect to cause. 200 years of firearms manufacturing at Beretta provide the main example. Strengths and limits of the CKG will be sketched. Among other features, CKGs can be used directly by engineers to learn about, store, and combine knowledge. CKGs and their evolution explain society-wide organization of technological knowledge into firms.
 

Session Information: Sunday, Nov 13, 2005, 13:30 - 15:00

Session Details
Title:KLIC III -- Knowledge Transfer Decision Support
Chair:   David Moore, Assistant Professor, Colorado School of Mines, Economics and Business Division, 814 15th Street, Golden CO 80401, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract Details
Title:Managing Employee Knowledge through External Knowledge Transfer and Learning-by-Doing
Lead: Cheryl Gaimon, Regents Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 West Peachtree St. NW, Atlanta GA, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Gulru Ozkan, PhD student, College of Management, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332-0520, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:We consider the situation where employee training is needed. We analyze dynamic strategies pursued by a firm that increases employee knowledge through learning-by-doing (internal source of knowledge creation) and by hiring consultants (external source for knowledge transfer). Key issues we address include the appropriate duration of consultancy engagement, the rate of pursuit in knowledge transfer, and the effect of learning-by-doing on the knowledge transfer process.
 
Title:The Economics of Speed
Lead: Rob Leachman, Professor, University of California, Berkeley, 4135 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley CA 94720-1777, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Shengwei Ding, University of California at Berkeley, 4135 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley CA 94720-1777, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:A delay cost model is introduced that quantitatively assesses revenue gains resulting from increased speed of manufacturing deployment and execution. Costs of projects or investments that increase speed may be weighed against revenue gains calculated using the model. The model is demonstrated on semiconductor industry data.
 
Title:Targeted Knowledge Transfer and Accelerated Organizational Learning
Lead: David Moore, Assistant Professor, Colorado School of Mines, Economics and Business Division, 814 15th Street, Golden CO 80401, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:The functional structure of production technologies having additively decomposable performance metrics may be exploited to accelerate learning. We present a general mathematical and economic framework for identifying productivity-enhancing knowledge transfer opportunities and evaluating the potential economic impact of successful knowledge transfer. Efficient data collection and analysis strategies, and differences between input-reducing and output-expanding learning will be highlighted.
 
Title:The Effect of Information Technology on Organizational Learning and Knowledge Transfer
Lead: Linda Argote, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Michael J. Ashworth, Doctoral Candidate in Computational Organization Science, Carnegie Mellon University, School of Computer Science, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Tridas Mukhopadhyay, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:We examine whether information technology affects organizational learning and knowledge transfer. We conducted an analysis of monthly data spanning five years at six financial institutions. Information technology was found to have a positive impact on productivity and quality as well as increase the rates at which the units improve their productivity and quality with experience. Information technology significantly enhances the transfer of productivity-enhancing knowledge.
 

 

Session Information: Sunday Nov 13, 2005 16:30 - 18:00

Session Details
Title:KLIC IV -- Organizing for Learning
Chair:   Nile Hatch, Marriott School - BYU, 790 TNRB, Provo UT 84602, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract Details
Title:Managing Customer Outrage: Focus Organizational Learning Efforts on Service Failure or Recovery?
Lead: Michael Lapré, Vanderbilt University, Owen Graduate School of Management, 401 21st Avenue South, Nashville TN 37203, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Firms must be prepared to recover from service failures to turn angry customers into loyal customers. Using mishandled-baggage data for 9 major US airlines over 11 years, I find that dissatisfaction with recovery contributes 88% to the variation in customer outrage, whereas service failure contributes only 12%. A U-shaped learning-curve effect and heterogeneity in learning curves are more important for recovery than for service failure. Hence, firms should pay more attention to service recovery.
 
Title:Towards a Behavioral Theory of Core-Periphery Evolution in Networks: A Model Based Analysis
Lead: Nitin Joglekar, BU School of Management, 595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston MA, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: N. Venkatraman, Boston Univeristy School of Management, 595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston MA 02215, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:We model the evolution of the core and the periphery of a social-network by extending the tenets of firm level behavioral decision making (i.e. target setting, expectations and choices that guide organizational learning) into network level constructs: embeddedness and interdependence. Our results document the efficacy of exploration and exploitation heuristics for building positional advantage and illustrate that performance of these heuristics is crucially affected by behavioral biases.
 
Title:Organizing for Innovation in the Motor Sports (NASCAR) Industry Cluster in Charlotte, NC
Lead: Carlos Martinez-Vela, MIT, 292 Main St, E38-104, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:In this case study I examine how NASCAR teams located in Charlotte, NC integrate knowledge to innovate and coordinate change. I find that integration is a social process that occurs when product development teams can initiate and sustain collaboration and conversations across occupational and organizational boundaries. I illustrate how NASCAR teams organize this process and propose a grounded theory model for organizing innovation and integration.
 
Title:Managerial Knowledge, Learning, and Intellectual Capital.
Lead: Margaret Peteraf, Professor, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth, 100 Tuck Hall, Hanover NH 03755, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Co-Author: Mark Shanley, Professor, Purdue University, Krannert Graduate School of Management, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907, United States, This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract:Managerial knowledge is a resource for firms. At the same time, the accumulation and deployment of that knowledge constitutes an important organizational capability. Coming to grips with a resource and capability set that is part of the entire firm's resource configuration and yet determines that configuration and how it evolves is a major task for theory development.
 

 

Last Updated ( Thursday, 02 November 2006 )
 
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